Saving Frankie

On the 15th of September this year a dog in extremely poor health wandered in to a yard in Geraldton, WA. The unnamed dog had no identification and was severely malnourished, neglected and injured. The stray dog had a gentle and loving nature, despite her obvious distress, and help was sought out to identify the dog on Facebook.


The dog was too ill to be impounded and required immediate medical attention and nutritional care. The dog remained in veterinary care with Chapman Animal Hospital during her impoundment time but unfortunately nobody came to collect her, so the team at Geraldton Dog Rescue stepped in to try to rehome her.

Geraldton Dog Rescue took the dog to Sanford Veterinary Clinic to complete a health assessment and it was discovered that “Francesca” or Frankie for short, (as named by the attending vet), had a grade five heart murmur. As there was no option for adoption for dogs with significant medical issues, Frankie was placed in palliative care. Despite knowing that Frankie’s time was limited, her capacity to love and be loved was not.

The team at Sandford’s reviewed and discussed Frankie’s case over and over to try to identify every possible diagnosis or cause and build a medical history to send to Murdoch University.

Frankie was reviewed by the team at The Small Animal Hospital at Murdoch University where they discovered something odd. Seeking confirmation of their unusual findings the Murdoch University team contacted the University of Sydney who provided preliminary confirmation that Frankie had an extremely rare heart condition known as Cor Triatriatum Dexter (a condition resulting in extra atrial chambers in the heart).

If Frankie could make it to Sydney by early November, corrective surgery could be performed. With no way to feasibly afford to get Frankie from one side of the country to the other in the required time, Frankie’s carers contacted Tarsha Andrews at Pet Rescue to see if there was anything that could be done to help save poor Frankie’s life.Tarsha then reached out to Pet Rescue’s animal transport partner, Jetpets, to arrange for Frankie’s return trip from Sydney, as she was booked on to Virgin as passenger cargo for her trip to Sydney.

Frankie is now home with her new family and is loving life with a new furry best friend to play with as well as a loving and supporting home to live in.

Frankie’s story is one of triumph over adversity and an example of what can happen when individuals and organisations work together to make a difference for one animal, whom will now go on to make a difference in the lives of everyone she meets.
Frankie’s new family wishes to thank each, and every person and organisation involved in saving Frankie’s life. We couldn’t be prouder to have been involved and we wish Frankie the very best as she continues to brighten the lives of those around her.

How to keep your pets happy as the weather cools down

Admit it, even if you prefer summer, you love cuddling up with warm blankets in winter! For those of us in the Southern Hemisphere, the cooler months are here, so it’s time to get your coats out from the back of the closet and dust off those beanies! While we have the luxury of indulging in a hot chocolate, our pets might find it a bit more difficult to adjust to the colder climate. That’s why we’ve put together a few tips to help keep your pets happy throughout the cooler months!

Cosy bedding

There’s no more satisfying feeling then jumping under the covers of your warm bed after a cool winter’s day, we’re sure our pets love it too! There’s a few different ways you can adjust your pet’s bedding for winter time, so here’s a few tips to ensure they get a cosy night’s sleep.

Outdoor pets

If your pet is comfortable staying outside during the colder months, make sure you’re making a few adjustments to accommodate the change in weather. Here’s a few tips for your outdoor pets!

  • Move their crate or kennel under cover, so they’re not disturbed by rain or hail.
  • Pop your pets favourite blanket inside their kennel or crate
  • Leave your pets with their own hot water bottle to cuddle up to! Make sure you let it cool down slightly before handing it over to your pet
  • Get their cosy knits on! A jumper that covers their stomach will help keep them warm through the chilly winter nights

Indoor pets

If your pets are getting older, it’s a great idea to keep them inside throughout the colder months. This will help aid sore joints or any aches or pains they might have. Head to your local pet store to grab your pets their own blankets so they can have a cosy night’s sleep!

Dinner time

Like us, our pets tend to burn more calories during the colder months, as our bodies try to keep us warm. So, a consistent diet is key to keeping your pets happy throughout winter! It’s always a good idea to discuss your pets diet with your vet before making any changes to their feeding schedule. 

Exercise

Just like us, our pets may feel less inclined to get up and moving during the colder months. We’d prefer to be inside on the couch too, but it’s important to make sure your pets are still getting enough exercise throughout winter. Here’s a few ways you and your pets can get active this winter:

  • Head to an indoor dog park! Your pup can still socialise, explore and exercise while sheltered from the weather
  • Invest in some new scratching posts for your cats, or if you’re feeling up to it – build your own!
  • Take advantage of your pet’s favourite toys, playing fetch inside for half an hour in the morning and in the afternoon, is a great way to get your pet moving when the weather isn’t looking too great

What do you and your pets do to settle into the colder months? Let us know on Facebook.