Tenzing’s Big Adventure

“Gentle, playful and friendly”. That is how Hamilton Zoo Keeper Delwyn Crombie described young red panda Tenzing – and that is certainly the experience we had when we took care of him during his transfer to Tasmania Zoo.

Born at Hamilton Zoo, Tenzing is three years old. From six weeks he was supplement fed, due to difficulty competing for his mothers milk with his much bigger twin sister Jamuna. Although he remained with his mum, Tenzing became a very friendly animal through regular contact with his keepers and became an ambassador for the red panda species.

Tenzing’s latest adventure saw him transfer to Tasmania Zoo as part of the breeding program to continue the conservation efforts for the species. On transfer day, Tenzing was well prepared and hopped into his travel crate remaining calm and relaxed. He travelled from Auckland to Melbourne where he enjoyed refreshments from a Jetpets Pet Handler during his stop over before continuing to Tasmania.

As you can see in the photo, there is no doubt Tenzing’s imagination would have been running wild as he enjoyed watching the world around him on the journey.

He has now settled into his new home. “Tenzing is doing well,” said Keeper Rochelle Penny. “I’d happily say he had a great trip over. He arrived into Launceston very calm and relaxed, after arriving he came straight out and began eating. I’d say he had worked up an appetite.”

Tasmania Zoo is a privately owned, local family-zoo situated 18kms from Launceston. They are dedicated to continuous contribution to wildlife conservation and to the education of the community at large.

Tasmania Zoo exhibits the largest collection of rare, exotic and native species in Tasmania, and with their newest addition Tenzing, is definitely worth a visit if you are in the area. You can find out more by visiting their website here.

 

Kamina the Pygmy Hippo flies first class with Jetpets

Here at Jetpets we often get asked “what is the most exotic animal you have ever transported?”

We have moved many amazing animals including cheetahs, sea lions, and recently two lionesses, but we did get a little excited when we were asked to take care of Kamina, a 20 month old Pygmy Hippo, as she travelled from Sydney to Darling Downs Zoo in Brisbane.

Photo Credit: Darling Downs Zoo

There are two types of Hippopotamuses – the large Common, or Nile Hippo and the much smaller Pygmy Hippo. Pygmy Hippos are about half the height of Common Hippos and less than a quarter of the weight of their larger relations.

Even though Kamina is the smaller type of Hippo, in her travel crate she still weighed in at 750 kilograms before being loaded onto her flight.

Jetpets coordinated VIP airside access for Kamina and her Zoo Keeper, where she had her own quiet area to relax pre-flight. She was kept hydrated and was fed some tasty vegetables by her Zoo Keeper right up to the minute she was transported onto the tarmac.

Kamina was loaded into her allocated stowage compartment on a flight direct from Sydney to Brisbane, where she was introduced into her new environment at Darling Downs Zoo.

“Kamina travelled beautifully. We are impressed with how calm she is and not at all fazed by the relocation”, said Director of Darling Downs Zoo, Steve Robinson.

Kamina is one of only five Pygmy Hippos in Australia – and she is related to them all. She is the only Pygmy Hippo now residing in Queensland.

She is at the age where she would naturally become independent of her mother and has made the move to Queensland to eventually be a part of a breeding program. This is critical to the establishment of a viable insurance population of this endangered species in Australian zoos.

Photo Credit – Darling Downs Zoo

Pygmy Hippos come from forested areas within West Africa and are semi-aquatic.  They do spend quite a lot of their time out of the water.  Their numbers have dwindled dramatically in the wild due to deforestation, hunting for bush meat and as a result of wars in areas of Africa. Because they are so difficult to find in the wild, most of what is known about this species has been identified through studying them in zoos.

If you would like to visit Kamina or learn more about Darling Downs Zoos conservation efforts, you can visit their website here and arrange a visit.

Maxi the Sea Lion arrives at Sea World 

Here at Jetpets we pride ourselves on providing a unique service to pet owners all over Australia but often we are tasked with looking after more exotic animals for many of Australia’s wildlife conservation programs and organisations.

This was certainly the case last month when we transported a male Australian Sea Lion, from Sydney Airport to Sea World on the Gold Coast. The Australian Sea Lion or “Maxi” as he is better known, was being transported to Sea World to join a coordinated breeding program between Sea World, Taronga Conservation Society Australia and ZAA (Zoo and Aquarium Association), aimed at increasing the numbers of this vital and endangered species.

Jetpets arrives with Maxi at his new home at Sea World

The Australian Sea Lion is found nowhere else in the world and their population is native to the rugged coastlines of South Australia and the southern tip of Western Australia. While the seals physical appearance is similar to other seal species, the Australian Sea Lion is unique in it’s breeding habits with females choosing to stay close to where they were raised and breeding only once every 18 months.

With Maxi being such an important traveller (and Jetpets first Sea Lion), our team were determined to make sure his trip was as smooth as possible. Being three years old and weighing in at 62kgs, we had to come up with travel solution that would enable us to transport Maxi the 900km distance to his new home at Sea World.

“With the support of Qantas freight staff and Sydney Airport we were able to give Maxi the royal treatment, ensuring his flight to his new home at Sea World was a smooth and stress free one.”, said Jetpets National Business Development Manager, Brett Headley.

Maxi the Sea Lion

On the day of travel our team worked closely with Maxi’s Zoo keepers and Qantas freight staff to ensure that Maxi had the very best of care with Jetpets even managing to arrange to have Maxi’s keeper travel out on to the tarmac with Maxi. Maxi and his keeper spent time in a nice quiet area to prepare for their flight and upon arrival in Brisbane, arranged for his keeper to have quick access to Maxi. Upon delivery Maxi was greeted by Sea World staff who couldn’t wait to get acquainted with their new arrival, with Maxi’s keeper helping to ease the transition to his new keepers.

“When Maxi arrived at Sea World, he spent two weeks in our quarantine area but has since moved to our Seal Theatre area where he will join the team of Seal Guardians in our new presentation educating our guests about the importance of reducing, reusing and recycling.”, said Sea World’s Mitchell Leroy.

Maxi being transported in a custom built travel crate

Seal Guardian is an educational presentation that will take visitors on a conservational mission to help protect the ocean from plastic pollution.

“Seal Guardian is an exciting new presentation which has a really important message about the impact plastic pollution is having on our oceans and what we can do to prevent further damage.”, said Sea World’s Curator of Mammals, Mitchell Leroy.

We look forward to watching Maxi develop as an ambassador for the protection of his species and spreading awareness of the importance of reducing pollutions in Australia’s oceans.

Jetpets assists in the relocation of Australia’s first breeding pair of Caracal cats

Recently Jetpets had the pleasure of assisting in the relocation of two Caracals from South Africa to their new home at the Wild Animal Encounter Conservation Centre in Hawkesbury, North of Sydney. The Caracals, Kato and Kaia are the only two Caracals currently on display in Australia and it’s hoped the unrelated pair will breed once they reach maturity in the next 12-18 months.

Picture : NRL Photos/Gregg Porteous

The success of the first ever Caracal breeding program in Australia rests in the very capable hands of Wild Animal Encounter’s company director, Ben Britton who you may recognise as the host of Australia’s Nat Geo Wild program.

Ben’s name has become synonymous with exotic wildlife education and throughout his 20-year career Ben has starred in several documentaries and television programs aimed at educating the public on animal behaviour and conservation.

“The Caracals have arrived safe and sound here and both animals are out exploring their new environment…We had a great reaction when they heard their first kookaburra this morning”, said Ben.

Caracal’s are known for their impressive ears which have the signature tufts of dark coloured hair on the points. The ears are manipulated by twenty muscles which enable the cats to locate prey animal sounds with startling accuracy. The Caracal’s paws are also specifically designed for stealth allowing them to get closer to prey animals which gives them a much higher chance of success when hunting birds or and small prey animals.

Wild Animal Encounters is not government funded and they rely heavily on donations and the support of the public to continue their important work promoting conservation. Private tours and animal encounters offer the unique opportunity to meet these amazing creatures while supporting the important work Wild Animal Encounters does.

We wish Kato and Kaia the very best as they explore their new environment and we will endeavour to check in with them in the future to bring you any updates. If you would like to book a tour to meet Kato and Kaia you can do so at www.wildanimalencounters.com.au

Picture : NRL Photos/Gregg Porteous

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Special Rhino Move

This month, we’re sharing a very exciting rhino move we were recently involved in with our friends at Qantas.

Mtoto the African White Rhinoceros (yes all 1.7 tonnes of him!) made the trip across the Tasman from Auckland to Sydney (via Christchurch) and eventually on to his new home at Altina Wildlife Park.

Find out more about this amazing move by clicking the image below.

rhino

Image credit: Altina Wildlife Park